Author Topic: Preparations for another longish trip  (Read 2978 times)

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Offline Three Dawg

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Preparations for another longish trip
« on: July 12, 2019, 13:04:28 PM »
With the MOT due on the GS next week, I am starting to check the old warhorse over in anticipation of our trip to South America later in the year.   It hasn't actually done that many miles since coming back from New Zealand, but it does need a wee bit of attention. And the weather is shite, so no riding.



The front brakes were dragging, so I gave them a good clean, including removing the pistons and cleaning behind the seals.   A good flush out with new fliud and the front wheel spins nicely now.

The rear disc looked in poor condition, and as I use it a lot (on gravel it's indispensible) - it drags the rear of the bike down which helps my wee short legs when coming to a halt - so I replaced it with a nice new Serie Oro Brembo disc and matching pads from Motorworks.  They must be good as they are painted red.  I do love the look of a brand new disc...



The rear mudguard had finally cracked, so I took it off and fitted a neat Touratech geegaw to fill the space.  Makes getting the rear wheel out a deal easier too.

The Wilbers shock will be needing its heavy duty spring as well.  I may remove the hydraulic adjuster and go for the normal ride height rings - apparently the hydraulic unit can fail in extreme conditions.



I've already fitted new, balanced, injector nozzles in an attempt to make the bike as smooth as possible, but I have also ordered up one of JohnGS's chips for the ignition to get rid of the very small amount of surging the bike has - I'll detail that when it arrives. 

The sidestand is rubbish on these bikes.  I have a hockey puck which can be used as a handy flat stone subsitute, but it's not ideal.



Found a new sidestand foot plate from a mob called DS Bikeprotection in Spain.



It looks like it will give a bit more effective length to the stand, so I'll only have to use the puck in really tricky spots.  Suspect I'll need the Dremel to get the old Wunderlich one off.  DS seem to be replicating some of the obsolete TT stuff like the steering 'hard part' and the gearbox reinforcement plates, but they do quite a lot of other bikes too.

More to do - I think I need to replace the internal fuel pipes in the tank for example.  Should have done this when I changed the pump, but I didn't cos I'm a numpty.  The tyre debate goes on, mostly in my head, at least that's where I hope the voices are...  I've narrowed it down to going with the Avon Treckriders as on the pic above, or a combo of Motoz Tractionator Adventure rear and TKC80 front.  I do know that the Avons will continue to grip towards the end of the trip when we go to Patagonia and it's likely to be wet.

And yes, I am sad enough to have printed off the road book with a BMW roundel on it. ;D  But it is a really good bike for this sort of thing.

« Last Edit: July 12, 2019, 13:15:38 PM by Three Dawg »
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Offline flyfifer

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Re: Preparations for another longish trip
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2019, 19:58:24 PM »
 ::) I don't think there is any "Ish" to be attached to the word Long , for your planned trip.

Offline LargeWayRound

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Re: Preparations for another longish trip
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2019, 22:11:25 PM »
Excellent Stuff

Sounds like a great Adventure your going to be having .
  8)
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Offline Three Dawg

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Re: Preparations for another longish trip
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2019, 08:04:16 AM »
Thanks.  Some might question the wisdom of doing this sort of thing on a 22 year old bike, but I think the old bus will keep on keeping on - the engine feels great at the moment.   And things like shipping insurance are calculated on the value of the bike, so having something cheap and reliable is often a good idea.  Anyway, I can't afford a new bike. ;D

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Offline Three Dawg

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Re: Preparations for another longish trip
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2019, 13:37:22 PM »
Hmm, well the DS Protect sidestand thingy was a fail.  No way could I fit it without it fouling the centre stand, and the opening for the foot of the stand seemed all wrong.  It'll have to go back.  To Spain.

Decided to have a go at fitting a plastic plate under the Wunderlich foot I was already using.  Needed a fair bit of fettling before I could use the centre stand properly, but it seems fine now.  Gives an extra 10mm or so.  Will see how it lasts - looks like it's touching the silencer in the pic, but there is a good 5mm clearance.  Dunno why BMW made the stand so short - the bike is in real danger of tipping over if it's fully loaded.

« Last Edit: August 14, 2019, 12:18:26 PM by Three Dawg »
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Offline Three Dawg

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Re: Preparations for another longish trip
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2019, 13:30:26 PM »
OK, so I decided to go for a sheepskin to help with the lousy seat a GS has.  Skyeskyns came up with the goods ( a pet mat actually).  I was going to cut it down to fit just over the front half of the seat, but Mrs 3D decided that she wanted some of it too, so I left it as it came.



I wanted it to be fitted securely as I often use the 'MacGregor Goosestep' to get on the bike when it's fully loaded, so I put some webbing and clips near the middle to hold it in place.





At the front I used 1" elastic, but cocked that up a bit by leaving it too long.  Still, easy enough to fold it over and stitch up. 

A couple of velcro tabs at the rear stapled on and we're good to go.  Might seem a bit OTT, but I quite enjoyed the job, and it ain't gonna slip off!





Every bike should come with its own hearthrug. ;D
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Offline lowflyer

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Re: Preparations for another longish trip
« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2019, 19:49:40 PM »
Looking good  8)
Be good to know if you think it makes a difference, in due course naturally.

As a matter of interest, is that the shaggy fleece ? I thought you could also get the shorn version ??? , just wondering whether to go shorn or "au natural "  :)

Thanks for posting.
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Offline Three Dawg

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Re: Preparations for another longish trip
« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2019, 21:01:48 PM »
I think it may be a medium cut.  I know that the Alaskan leather 'buttpads' are shorter cut and that's what they recommend.  Sam Manicom  https://adventuremotorcycle.com/tech-n-tips/how-to-sheepskin-seat-cover reckons that the longer ones sort of get knots in them and become more comfortable as a result.  Who knows?  Might try the foam underlay too if there isn't much of an improvement.
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Offline Three Dawg

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Re: Preparations for another longish trip
« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2019, 16:31:31 PM »
So the gear position indicator isn't working.  Started failing a while ago, and between here and New Zealand it crapped out completely.  So what, you might ask.  Well, I quite like to quickly glance at the gear position if I'm coming up to a tricky section - don't want to accidentally bang it down to first and waste valuable seconds booting it up again.

So, after a little consultation I decided to change the offending switch, which irritatingly is on the back of the gearbox where you can't get at it.  Ho hum.

As it turned out, it's not too bad to get the swingarm off -  took me about and hour and a half, including spending some quality time heating the pivot bolts to soften the 22 year old Loctite



It's not exactly handy.



And the bolts holding it on are bloody small.  I had been warned that they might snap, and I did not like putting a spanner on them I can tell you, but they came out OK.  May replace them with stainless Allen bolts, especially as the heads of bolts are very close to the switch housing - quite difficult to get the socket in there



Just have to wait until a replacement comes from Germany.  Should probably get the heavy spring put on the shock now, I really don't want to take that off again any time soon.



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Offline Three Dawg

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Re: Preparations for another longish trip
« Reply #9 on: August 14, 2019, 12:11:10 PM »
Well all the components associated with the swingingarm are all cleaned off and ready to go back on the bike, but no sign of the gear indicator switch just yet, so time to change the spring on the shock.

You can of course just jack up the preload (ride height) on the standard spring, but having a heavier coil is a better way to go when you're two up, loaded and on rough terrain - really noticed in NZ on a couple of occasions when I bottomed out the standard spring (shoulda changed it for that trip), something I never do with the heavier one.

Taking the shock to the shop is a PITA and expensive at £25 a time, so I bought a nice Laser Tools spring compressor to do the job at home.  Works a treat.



That's the collar out, and yes I did wear safety glasses!



New spring on, clean up with GT85 spray and ready to go back on.  The difference a good shock makes is incredible.  Even without the high and low speed damping adjustment mine has.  A standard GS shock starts to go off very quickly when it's worked hard - this Wilbers just keeps on doing it's job - making the bike feel like a magic carpet. ;D

« Last Edit: August 14, 2019, 12:13:51 PM by Three Dawg »
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Offline JimRidesThis!

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Re: Preparations for another longish trip
« Reply #10 on: August 14, 2019, 17:55:50 PM »
Dunno why BMW made the stand so short - the bike is in real danger of tipping over if it's fully loaded.

I lengthened my 1100’s sidestand by welding in  a 1.5” section of tube (and also welded 9n a bigger footplate). That cured the issue.
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Offline Three Dawg

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Re: Preparations for another longish trip
« Reply #11 on: August 14, 2019, 18:48:40 PM »
Aye, that's the best solution for sure.  Might try to source another and get that mod done at some stage.  My mate who has a late model Triple Black was complaining about his stand the other day, so I guess BMW think they are right.  They're not. ::)
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